In that sense, Whole30 has been so helpful in understanding my body. So how am I eating now? I would say that I'm eating pretty "paleo" these days. I definitely still indulge once in a while, with some red wine or french fries, but I haven't been tempted to binge in the slightest. I would definitely do Whole30 again, but I need a bit of a break from it at the moment. Instead, I'm ready for a mindful and moderate approach to my new chapter of life, back in New York City.
There have been several studies linking low-carb diets to increased mortality.  Epidemiological studies and meta-analysis have shown an increased risk of mortality with carbohydrate intake < 40%.[12][13]  However, the recent Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study, a large prospective nutrition study involving over 135,000 participants across the globe, found a relationship between increased mortality and higher carbohydrate intake, and lower mortality associated with higher fat intake.[14] Until long term, randomized studies can be undertaken, the long-term effect is unclear.
The main benefit of Whole30 though is to see how certain food groups affect your body. If you normally eat everything, you'll never really know if dairy may be making you bloated or if grains may be upsetting your stomach. By cutting out most of the food groups and processed foods for 30 days and slowly reintroducing them into your diet, you'll be able to spot which foods are doing what to your body. 

Carbohydrates are a type of nutrient made up of simple sugars (monosaccharides) that bind together to form complex molecules. Depending on how the sugars are combined, they might create disaccharides (double sugars like lactose and sucrose), oligosaccharides (short chain sugars called glycoproteins and glycolipids), and polysaccharides (long chain sugars, like starch and cellulose).
When it comes to losing weight, calorie counting is crazy, but shifting your attention to the types of foods you eat and focusing on mindful eating can make all the difference. Low-carb diets have a reputation for producing fast weight loss without feeling hungry or needing to count calories. In fact, many people experience weight loss following a low-carb diet even if they’ve tried “everything else” and never got the results they were looking for.

Another 2014 study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition compared the effects of the Paleo plan to those of a standard low-fat diet on 70 obese, postmenopausal women. After six months, the Paleo group lost 14 pounds on average, while the other group lost nearly 6 pounds. After a year, the Paleo group had lost 19 pounds on average, and the low-fat dieters had dropped 10 pounds. A year later, both groups had regained some weight: The Paleo group was still down 10 pounds, while the low-fat group had dropped an average of more than 6 pounds.

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