This theory is partially accurate. The issue is that there are different kinds of carbohydrates, loosely broken into simple and complex. Simple carbohydrates are sugars, like, well, sugar (sucrose and high fructose corn syrup are most common). Complex carbohydrates include starch and "fiber." While you can get starch from white flour and white rice, you can only get fiber from eating "whole grains", like wheat bread, brown rice, and rye bread, for example. You can also get fiber from eating certain fruits and vegetables. The difference is really only how complex the molecular chain is, which impacts how difficult it is for your body to break up, and then use. During digestion, simple carbohydrates can be absorbed into your blood stream very quickly with little or no modification. Starches take longer to break down, and so enter the blood stream more slowly when eaten. Fiber is difficult for your body to break down at all, and most of it goes right through you and out the other end undigested. The low-carb theory above is accurate, but only with simple sugars.[6]. Unfortunately, the Western diet today contains all too much sugars and other processed high glycemic index short-chain carbohydrates, which should be avoided anyway.


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Obesity, heart disease, and diabetes: These are just a few of the health conditions that proponents of thePaleolithic diet, or caveman diet, blame on our sedentary lifestyles and modern diets, which are loaded with sugar, fat, and processed foods. Their proposed solution? Cut modern foods from our diet and return to the way our early hunter-gatherer ancestors ate.
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